Physics and Astronomy Colloquia, Academic Year 2019-2020

Colloquium committee: Marivi Fernandez-Serra (Chair), Will Farr, Dmitri Kharzeev, Rouven Essig and Giacinto Piacquadio


Coffee & Tea served at 3:45 pm.

Talk begins at 4:15 pm.

Location: Harriman 137 (bottom of square C4 on the campus map)

Movies:  To watch the recorded movies, please  read the instructions here.

 

Fall 2019 colloquia


Sept. 3

Chair’s Colloquium


Chair’s Colloquium
   [recorded movies]
   VLC:
rtsp://www.physics.sunysb.edu:5554/chair-090319

Sept. 10

Dan Mckinsey

University of Berkeley

From Liquid Xenon to Superfluid Helium: Dark Matter Direct Detection with Noble Liquids

Noble liquids have proven high effective in the search for interactions of dark matter with ordinary matter. This is due to their intrinsic scalability, low backgrounds, straightforward purification, and copious signal carriers. The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) experiment was a dual-phase (liquid/gas) xenon time projection chamber with an active mass of 250 kg that operated at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) from 2013 until 2016. Its main objective was to look for evidence of galactic dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). I will report the most recent LUX results from several new data analyses such as searches for axions, axion-like particles, low-mass dark matter interactions, and rate modulation in the data. I will also present recent calibration studies of the ionization and scintillation response of liquid xenon, such as pulse shape discrimination, electronic recoil calibrations using 83mKr, 127Xe, and 14C, and nuclear recoil calibration using a pulsed D–D neutron generator. These calibrations are essential to the development of the next generation of dark matter detectors, such as the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment which is currently being assembled at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. I will present the design, current status, and projected scientific performance of LZ, which is expected to begin underground operations in 2020.            Finally, I will describe a method to search for low-mass dark matter particles using superfluid helium., dubbed HeRALD. Because the helium nucleus is relatively low in mass, it has good kinematic matching to low-mass dark matter particles. Also, because helium is liquid down to absolute zero, this enables an easily purified target material in which extremely small energy depositions may be detected using low-temperature calorimetric devices such as transition edge sensors. This method is intrinsically scalable to large target masses, and background rejection may be achieved using information carried from the interaction site by photons, phonons, and rotons.
  [recorded movies]  


Sept. 17

Mengkun Liu

TBA

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Sept. 24

Chris Rasmussen

CERN

Using Trapped Antihydrogen to Probe Fundamental Symmetries

Antihydrogen - the antimatter equivalent the ordinary hydrogen atom - offers a unique way of probing fundamental symmetries. In particular, CPT symmetry (Charge, Parity and Time) requires that the spectrum of antihydrogen be identical to that of its ordinary matter cousin. In the ALPHA experiment at CERN, antihydrogen atoms are synthesized and magnetically trapped to enable spectroscopic measurements and subsequent comparison to the hydrogen spectrum. Of particular interest is the 1S-2S transition, which, due to its very narrow natural line width, allows for a particularly high precision test of CPT symmetry. Our best measurement of this transition frequency thus far has a relative error of just 2 parts in a trillion, making it one of the most precise measurements performed on an antimatter system. Antimatter gravity is another topic of growing interest, with several experiments aiming to make a first observation of the free-fall acceleration of antimatter. ALPHA-g is a new experiment which aims to measure this acceleration through the careful release of magnetically trapped antihydrogen atoms, eventually reaching a precision of around 1%. In this talk I will present the state-of-the art in antihydrogen physics and outline some of the measurements that will be possible in the near future.
  [recorded movies]  


Oct. 1

Derek Teaney

Stony Brook University

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Oct. 8

Josh Ruderman

NYU

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Oct. 22

Gabor Balazsi

Laufer Center, Stony Brook University

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Oct. 29

Giuseppe Carleo

CCQ, Flatiron Institute

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Nov. 12

Naoko Neilson

Drexel University

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Nov. 19

Zein-Eddine Meziani

Argonne Nat. Lab.

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Nov. 26

Mina Arvanitaki

Perimeter Institute

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


Dec 3

Mike Wilking

Stony Brook University

TBA

TBA
  [recorded movies]  


 




Spring 2020 colloquia





 


 




 

Jan. 28

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Feb. 4

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Feb. 11

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Feb. 18

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Feb. 25

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Mar. 3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Mar. 10

Peter van Nieuwenhuizen

Stony Brook University

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

Essig

Mar. 24

Oliver Monti

University of Arizona

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Mar. 31

Marlan Scully

Texas A&M

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

Liu

Apr. 7

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Apr. 14

Pablo Jarrillo-Herrero

MIT

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

Apr. 21

Nora Berrah

University of Connecticut

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

Weinacht

Apr. 28

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

  [recorded movies] 

MVFS

May 5

Matthew Dawber

SBU

Graduate Program Awards

TBA

  [recorded movies]